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Walking with Bigfoot in Pocatello

By By Chris Cole
Published On: Jun 15 2013 06:49:24 PM CDT
Updated On: Jun 15 2013 06:49:37 PM CDT

Many people have their own reasons for believing, not believing or just being curious.

POCATELLO, Idaho -

Believers, skeptics and truth seekers gathered to talk about all things Bigfoot in eastern Idaho.

The question at Saturday's Sasquatch convention in Pocatello may have been whether or not you believe in Sasquatch, but Dr. Jeff Meldrum says there's more to it than that.

"If it exists, it provides an exceptional natural experiment for better understanding our own adaptations," said Meldrum, a professor of anatomy and anthropology at Idaho State University. He is known in the community for working with Sasquatch samples.

Many people have their own reasons for believing, not believing or just being curious.

From hearing strange sounds during a camping trip that no one can explain to finding a mysterious rock that wasn't there before, many people turned out at the event to tell their stories about Sasquatch.

"It's an opportunity to get together and share their experiences, to learn from other people's experiences and interpretations of those experiences," Meldrum explained.

One presentation explained ideas of a verbal Sasquatch language while another focused on glyphs and a written language. Others showed images of sightings, including materials left behind in triangular shapes, including rocks.

One point of interest for Meldrum is the footprints. He says this more than anything is why he feels the subject demands further scrutiny.

But does he believe in Sasquatch?

"No, I don't believe,” Meldrum said. “Am I convinced? Yes. I'm convinced based on the evidence. At the very least the study, the investigation of the question is absolutely justified."

Meldrum said he is heading to another conference next week in Portland, Oregon.

He is working on getting corporate sponsors and private donations for his new undertaking called the Falcon Project.

He said this project will use thermal imaging scans and high definition cameras on a helium-filled airship. 

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