Idaho Falls
53° F
Clear
Clear

Same-sex couples in 37 states still waiting for equality

By Stephanie Hale-Lopez
Published On: Jun 26 2013 07:21:31 PM CDT
Updated On: Aug 20 2013 04:47:14 PM CDT

The Supreme Court's decision really only directly affects same-sex couples living in states that allow gay marriage.

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho -

Wednesday's ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States was a major victory for gay rights supporters.

At the same time, the court's decision really only directly affects same-sex couples living in states that allow gay marriage.

At the moment, 37 states don't allow same-sex marriage.

There are thousands of same-sex couples who will have to wait even longer for those rights finally granted to gay couples living in the 13 states that do allow same-sex marriage.

Like many gay and lesbian couples, Shannon Havins and Johannah Thompson, have been keeping an eye on the Supreme Court for months.

"I thought it was exciting for what it was," said Shannon. "I was hoping for a little more, but I was happy for what we got. I think the Supreme Court did a good job."

Wednesday's ruling brings them hope.

Shannon and Johannah have been engaged for close to a year. They share a home and have a family of their own.

"We're all humans, we're all cut from the same cloth, just stitched together with different color thread," said Johannah. "That's what makes life beautiful. You need to love everybody and accept everybody for who they are and what makes them happy."

As same-sex couples across the country wed in equality, Shannon and Johannah anxiously wait for their turn.

"We'll have a date when Idaho decides we can marry here," said Shannon. "We like where we live. We don't want to have to go away."

Until then, the two say they will keep loving, living and celebrating.

"Even though it doesn't give me the right to marry the person I want to marry, I'm glad it gives people who are already married the right to treat each other like they're married," said Shannon.

The high court's ruling will bring equal rights to more than 100,000 gays and lesbians who were legally married.

The LGBT community in Idaho Falls said today's ruling shows that love is love.

It's still up to the individual states to make their own decisions on same-sex marriage.

Advertisement