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Watch out for counterfeit bills

By Staff Writer
Published On: Jan 15 2014 05:23:04 PM CST
Updated On: Jan 15 2014 06:48:11 PM CST

Police are warning local business owners to check the money they collect after three fake $100 bills were passed in Idaho Falls.

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho -

Police are warning local business owners to check the money they collect.

The Idaho Falls Police Department learned Tuesday afternoon that two suspects bought $223 in merchandise with three fake $100 bills at the Aeropostale store at the Grand Teton Mall.

Police said the man and woman are Hispanic and between the ages of 25 and 30.

Police said they also tried to buy things with the phony money at Gymboree children's clothing store at the mall.

If you have information on these suspects, call police at (208) 529-1200 or Crimestoppers at 522-1983.

How to spot a fake

Here are some tips from the U.S. Secret Service on how to detect counterfeit bills:

  • Portrait: The genuine portrait appears lifelike and stands out distinctly from the background. The counterfeit portrait is usually lifeless and flat. Details merge into the background which is often too dark or mottled.
  • Federal Reserve and Treasury seals: On a genuine bill, the saw-tooth points of the Federal Reserve and Treasury seals are clear, distinct, and sharp. The counterfeit seals may have uneven, blunt, or broken sawtooth points.
  • Border: The fine lines in the border of a genuine bill are clear and unbroken. On the counterfeit, the lines in the outer margin and scrollwork may be blurred and indistinct.
    Serial numbers: Genuine serial numbers have a distinctive style and are evenly spaced. The serial numbers are printed in the same ink color as the Treasury Seal. On a counterfeit, the serial numbers may differ in color or shade of ink from the Treasury seal. The numbers may not be uniformly spaced or aligned.
  • Paper: Genuine currency paper has tiny red and blue fibers embedded throughout. Often counterfeiters try to simulate these fibers by printing tiny red and blue lines on their paper. Close inspection reveals, however, that on the counterfeit note the lines are printed on the surface, not embedded in the paper. It is illegal to reproduce the distinctive paper used in the manufacturing of the United States currency.
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